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  • 8x63 All


     
    IDnumber87
    Caliber8x63
    Modelsk ptr m/32 prj m/32
    Projectile form-
    Projectile weight14,13 Gram
    Projectile material-
    Projectile typeBall
    Colour markings-
    V0 mpsV25 750 m/s
    V0 fps-
    Propellant-
    Propellant weight Gram3,6 gram
    Propellant weight Grain-
    This is the standard ball ammunition.


     
    IDnumber88
    Caliber8x63
    Modelsk ptr m/32 slprj m/39
    Projectile form-
    Projectile weight11,01 Gram
    Projectile material-
    Projectile typeTracer
    Colour markingsRed tip
    V0 mps824 mps
    V0 fps-
    Propellant-
    Propellant weight Gram-
    Propellant weight Grain-
    Illuminates in red. This is a cartridge with the early, red marking of the tip of the projectile.


     
    IDnumber89
    Caliber8x63
    Modelsk ptr m/32 slprj m/39
    Projectile form-
    Projectile weight11,01 Gram
    Projectile material-
    Projectile typeTracer
    Colour markingsWhite tip
    V0 mps824 mps
    V0 fps-
    Propellant-
    Propellant weight Gram-
    Propellant weight Grain-
    Illuminates in red. This is a cartridge with the later, white marking of the tip of the projectile.


     
    IDnumber90
    Caliber8x63
    Modelsk ptr m/32 brand prj m/41
    Projectile form-
    Projectile weight9,9 Gram
    Projectile material-
    Projectile typeIncendiary
    Colour markingsOrange tip
    V0 mps-
    V0 fps-
    Propellant-
    Propellant weight Gram-
    Propellant weight Grain-
    -


     
    IDnumber91
    Caliber8x63
    Modelsk ptr m/32 pprj m/39
    Projectile form-
    Projectile weight11,8 gram
    Projectile material-
    Projectile typeArmour piercing
    Colour markingsBlack tip
    V0 mps780 mps
    V0 fps-
    Propellant-
    Propellant weight Gram3,6 gram
    Propellant weight Grain-
    The projectile has a steel core that gives the projectile good penetration on hard targets. The steel core weights 3,2 gram.


     
    IDnumber92
    Caliber8x63
    Model-
    Projectile form-
    Projectile weight-
    Projectile material-
    Projectile typeInert
    Colour markings-
    V0 mps-
    V0 fps-
    Propellant-
    Propellant weight Gram-
    Propellant weight Grain-
    This is a early type if inert round


     
    IDnumber93
    Caliber8x63
    Model-
    Projectile form-
    Projectile weight-
    Projectile material-
    Projectile typeInert
    Colour markings-
    V0 mps-
    V0 fps-
    Propellant-
    Propellant weight Gram-
    Propellant weight Grain-
    This is the early form of inert round that has been "updated" by getting the projectile painted green to follow the newer regulations on cartridge markings.


     
    IDnumber125
    Caliber8x63
    Model
    Projectile form
    Projectile weight14,2 gram
    Projectile material
    Projectile typeBall
    Colour markingsBlue tip
    V0 mpsV25 750 m/s
    V0 fps-
    Propellant
    Propellant weight Gram3,6 gram
    Propellant weight Grain-
    This blued tip ammunition is of less quality than the normal military ammunition, and is not to be used as war ammunition.


     
    IDnumber136
    Caliber8x63
    Model-
    Projectile form-
    Projectile weight-
    Projectile material-
    Projectile typeInert
    Colour markingsGreen projectile
    V0 mps-
    V0 fps-
    Propellant-
    Propellant weight Gram-
    Propellant weight Grain-
    This is the late style inert round of 8x63. The "projectile" is a full length rod going to the bottom of the case.


     
    IDnumber170
    Caliber8x63
    Model
    Projectile form
    Projectile weight
    Projectile material
    Projectile typeBall
    Colour markingsBlack belt on projectile
    V0 mps
    V0 fps-
    Propellant
    Propellant weight Gram
    Propellant weight Grain-
    This is a really rare cartridge. It is produced in the Karlsborg factory in 1940 and is loaded with a German B. patrone (Beobachtung Patrone) projectile. Even the color of the projectile follows the German standard pattern, and the projectile is most probably produced in Germany.
    This is an observation cartridge, actually an incendiary explosive. When hitting a target, a built in anvil triggers a small amount of tetryl setting fire to white phosphorus creating a puff of white smoke that can be seen on long distance. There is some good clips on YouTube showing the effects of this projectile when hitting a target.

    From Rude of Åtvidaberg collection.


     
    IDnumber193
    Caliber8x63
    Model
    Projectile form
    Projectile weight14,2 gram
    Projectile material
    Projectile typeBall
    Colour markingsGreen tip
    V0 mpsV25 750 m/s
    V0 fps-
    Propellant
    Propellant weight Gram3,6 gram
    Propellant weight Grain-
    This cartridges has the earlier, green tip of the projectile normally labled "not for automatic rifles". Later it is changed for a blue tip, "only for peace time shooting". This cartridges might of been intended for the rifle m/40, the only non automatic rifle used. I have not yet seen any boxes for the green or blue tipped 8x63 ammunition, so I do not really have any further information if any to be found on a label.


     
    IDnumber194
    Caliber8x63
    Model8 mm sk ptr m/32 slprj m/39
    Projectile form
    Projectile weight11,0 gram
    Projectile material
    Projectile typeTracer
    Colour markingsWhite tip
    V0 mps780 m/s
    V0 fps-
    Propellant
    Propellant weight Gram
    Propellant weight Grain-
    This tracer cartridge has a red case mouth seal and a quite rough case mouth crimp. The primer annulus has a black colour. The projectile jackets material is made of GMCS. This is the only cartridge of the 8x63 that is using a case mouth seal, and the reason behind it is unknown to me. It is of a late production though, 1945 from the Karlsborg factory.


     
    IDnumber195
    Caliber8x63
    Model
    Projectile form
    Projectile weight
    Projectile material
    Projectile typeTracer
    Colour markings
    V0 mps
    V0 fps-
    Propellant
    Propellant weight Gram
    Propellant weight Grain-
    This cartridge created 1940 has a odd primer. It is non magnetic and are dark to the color. I have my suspicion of that the primers might be manufactured in Germany and then imported to Sweden.


     
    IDnumber213
    Caliber8x63
    Model
    Projectile form
    Projectile weight
    Projectile material
    Projectile typeIncendiary
    Colour markingsYellow tip
    V0 mps
    V0 fps-
    Propellant
    Propellant weight Gram
    Propellant weight Grain-
    The 8x63 with the Hungarian incendiary projectile were imported in 1941 for the account of KFF. I have never seen this projectile for any other country, and that is strange. It is also unusual with the ogival form of the projectile. For the time they are usually of Spitz types. My only guess is that this form can carry more reactive materials inside the projectile.


     
    IDnumber215
    Caliber8x63
    Model
    Projectile form
    Projectile weight
    Projectile material
    Projectile typeInert
    Colour markingsGreen projectile
    V0 mps-
    V0 fps-
    Propellant-
    Propellant weight Gram-
    Propellant weight Grain-
    This inert round is quite unusual. I have not found a model number for it, and the samples I have seen are all manufactured by Karlsborg ammunition factory in 1932 or 1938. The case is in plane brass, not chromed as the later 8x63 models. I have no proof of it, but I have a hunch that this first type were ordered by the air force. It is to be found samples in the air force museums in Sweden, and I have some samples on the air force metallic desintergrating link.


     
    IDnumber216
    Caliber8x63
    Model
    Projectile form
    Projectile weight
    Projectile material
    Projectile typeTracer
    Colour markings
    V0 mps
    V0 fps-
    Propellant
    Propellant weight Gram
    Propellant weight Grain-
    Is this a manufacturing error? The tip is neither white or black, just gray. It is probably a tracer ere the white paint have been polluted in production. I think it is a interesting cartridge though, and if you happen to have a insight of your own feel free to suggest it to me.


     
    IDnumber218
    Caliber8x63
    Model8 mm pbr ptr m/32-40
    Projectile form
    Projectile weight15,7 gram
    Projectile material
    Projectile typeArmour piercing
    Colour markingsBlack tip
    V0 mps725
    V0 fps-
    Propellant
    Propellant weight Gram3,6 gram
    Propellant weight Grain-
    Despite the shortage of tungsten in 1940, an amount of the material is reserved for a development and production of a new 8x63 AP cartridge. An AP cartridge m/39 is already in production, but the penetration capabilities is not considered sufficient. The request for the new AP cartridges comes from both the army and the air force.
    The tungsten is the most relevant material to produce incandescent lamps, the electric light bulbs. It is used as the filament and cannot be exchanges for any other material really, so the prioritization is clear.



    But as there is a shortage of tungsten the production is in small scale. [1]. Small caliber ammunition with a wolfram core is identified through the 15 mm black tip, compared with the "normal" AP with a 5-8 mm black tip of the projectile [2]

    The tungsten projectiles is according to the SAN report of November 1941 to of been tested in Karlsborg. The results were good in the machine gun, but giving a poor accuracy in the rifle m/40 with a "considerately deviation", not giving any tight groups on the fiering range. The already manufactured projectiles cannot be altered, so a recommendation is done to make cartridges of the produced bullets and pack them to be used in the air force machine guns. There is no need of delivering the ammunition to the army before the design is improved.
    There were also thoughts of developing tracer and explosive ammunition with tungsten core, but the ideas were canceled due to the shortage of tungsten in Sweden.

    SAN September 1941 [3]
    The production of the projectile is running at the Luma factory in southern Hammarbyhamnen in Stockholm with a capacity of 120.000 projectiles/ month. The order for 3.000.000 projectiles will with this pace be finalized in about 3 years time.
    At the trials at the Karlsborg factory, the results is good for the machine gun, while with the rifle m/40 the spreading is really large. Tests is performed to modify the rifle.

    SAN report of April 1941 page 2-3
    The intention is to split the order of 3 million cartridges in two, one for KATD and one for KFF.

    KATD has the intention to use the ammunition only for the PV rifle m/40. They want the ammunition to be loaded with normal 8 mm m/32 cases, and put 4 PCS on the same loading clip used for the 6,5 mm m/94 ammunition.

    KFF wish to have their ammunition without loading frames or ammunition belt. They wish to have the ammunition loaded to the same degree as KATD.

    The designation for the cartridge is 8 mm pbr ptr m/32-40 [4]

    The m/40 is on a display on a ammunition board manufaktured 1955 or later. [5]

    As the results is not to satisfaction for rifle m/40, the proposal is made to load the projectiles already produced and deliver those to the airforce. As the projectiles cannot be altered, the army has to wait until the design is finalised. [6]


    [1] Ammunitionsnämndens rapport sid 15
    [2] Amkat 1945 (A03)
    [3] SAN report september 1941 page 5
    [4] SAN report April 1942
    [5] FVM.153253
    [6] SAN report November 1941 page 5


     
    IDnumber219
    Caliber8x63
    ModelE
    Projectile form
    Projectile weight
    Projectile material
    Projectile typeBall
    Colour markings
    V0 mps
    V0 fps-
    Propellant
    Propellant weight Gram
    Propellant weight Grain-
    The steel cased 8x63 is a not so known of in general. As of today there is reported of only one known example, to be found in the Woodin collection in the USA. This case is plain to the sight and only a magnet shows that the case is made of steel. It has a bottom stamp of Amf 31 and is missing both the "E" that would indicate it is made of "Ersättningsmateriel", e.g. steel, and the manufacturing year. Factory code 31 is representing the Svensk Tändsticks AB, Jönköping.

    The general issue I guess is that a werry few really know that it is supposed to exist! The bottom is supposed to be stamped as shown in the educational poster from 1947, a Karlsborg produced case dated 1943 with an letter "E" 12 o clock in the head stamp. But, this is a fact that may not be true in reality, as educational posters has been showing on incorrect bottom stamps before. In one way I thoughts that the persons doing the posters did not have no imagination to make up the head stamp, but on the other hand they were maybe not interested enough to look at and correct real samples and then just going by the handbook.

    The steeled cased 8x63 were indeed intended for training, and the boxes were to be packed as 80 or 85 rounds per box, in a crate of 1000 PCS, no loading clips or belts included.

    The first cases were intended to be produced by Vulcans Tändsticksfabrik, Tidaholm in late 1941 or early 1942. The steel to be found suitable came from Uddeholm AB and were of their brand UHB Forma. The same steel were used for manufacturing 9x19, 8x63 and 6,5x55 cases, but the responsibilities were laid upon different factory per case type. The 9x19 and the 6,5x55 is well known today, so my best guess right now is that the 8x63 production were cancelled and switched for 6,5x55 production instead, a thing that also were made for other planned 8x63 productions at the time. The background is that the 8x63 ammunition were a ammunition for combat and not so often used for training. The stock were built up and not used, while the need for 6,5x55 were not in balance in production capacity. The archive will give me the answer in the future.


     
    IDnumber229
    Caliber8x63
    Model
    Projectile form
    Projectile weight
    Projectile material
    Projectile typeInert
    Colour markings
    V0 mps
    V0 fps-
    Propellant
    Propellant weight Gram
    Propellant weight Grain-
    The inert ammunition with just one groove can be counted in one hands fingers, and I can really only think of the 9x20 inert m/19.
    All the inert 8x63 ammunition I have seen until now has the typical two grooves in the case.



    Copyright © 2000 Chris
    The Swedish military ammunition site

    Pcs published: 19